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Stem Cells and Sports Injuries: Innovating with Regenerative Medicine

If you lead an active lifestyle, then a sports injury can mean a long, hard recovery process that prevents you from doing the things you love most. If you’ve had a sports injury before, then you know that traditional treatments can include difficult things like surgery, lengthy physical therapy, and long periods of rest. One exciting new option in the Kirkland area is adult stem cell therapy, one of the leading options in regenerative medicine. Dr. Partington partners with Axis Stem Cell Institute, a group of experts in stem cell therapy for sports injuries and chronic health conditions. Here’s what to know about this exciting new option and how it can help.

What is a sports injury?

Sports injuries can present in a lot of different ways in active individuals. Most often, they affect the musculoskeletal system which includes the joints, muscles, and bones. Injuries to these tissues include broken bones, fractures, bruising, dislocations, separations, swelling, and ligament tears. Because of the nature of these injuries, you can experience a lot of pain during even small movements which may require a long time to heal. Some injuries don’t ever fully heal, meaning your active lifestyle might not be the same going forward. Unfortunately, traditional treatment methods for sports injuries aren’t as effective as they could be when it comes to getting you back to the activities you love. Stem cell therapy is a great, non-invasive way to bring healing and repair to your injured tissue to ensure longevity and recruit the body’s natural healing process.

Who can benefit from stem cell treatments?

Patients who can benefit most from stem cell therapy for sports injuries are those who are looking for an alternative to conventional treatment methods such as surgery, or those who have experience failed surgical results. Some patients have also been told they are not good candidates for these conventional treatments and can thus benefit from stem cell therapy. Adipose derived stem cell therapy, sometimes called SVF (stromal vascular fraction), requires a simple minimally-invasive procedure to collect fatty tissue in office. No pain pills or crutches required.

How do stem cell treatments for sports injuries work?

Stem cells that are derived from adipose tissue are one of the best options when it comes to regenerating tissues. This is because adipose tissue contains high amounts of mesenchymal cells, which are adult stem cells known for their effectiveness in regenerating tissues involved in the bones, muscles, and cartilage. Treatment begins with a quick and easy collection process, after which the cells are prepared and made ready for injection. After the stem cells are injected into the injured area, you can return home. This process occurs over the course of the same day so that your stem cells are most effective and potent.

Do stem cells really work?

Stem cells are growing in popularity within the new field of regenerative medicine and we have a lot to learn about their limits and possibilities. However, stem cell treatments for knees, joints, and muscles are rapidly growing in demand because of their effectiveness and results. Currently, stem cell therapies have shown great promise in speeding healing, reducing inflammation, restoring important structures, and relieving pain. Additionally, they have a lot of benefits when it comes to availability and safety. This means that stem cell therapies may become a treatment of choice in the future when it comes to sports injuries and chronic conditions!

Schedule a Consultation

It’s clear that stem cells have a lot of potential in both the medical and cosmetic fields, and we’re excited to partner with Axis Stem Cell Institute so you can begin exploring your options with regenerative medicine. To get started or to learn more about your options, check out the experts in regenerative medicine here.

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